© 2021 Greek Community Tribune All Rights Reserved

Disaster of unprecedented proportions in

Greece

22 August 2021 Greece has been ravaged by hundreds of wildfires in August, during its most severe heat wave in decades, which left unprecedented devastation to the forests and towns. Other Mediterranean countries – Turkey, Italy, Algeria and Spain among them – have suffered similar problems. The two major fires in Greece began in early August, one on the island of Evia and another in a national park north of Athens. The environmental devastation from the fires in northern Evia is enormous, according to a statement issued by the meteorological service of the National Observatory of Athens (NOA). According to the NOA, a total of 126,023 acres (or 510,000 stremmata) has been burned on the island of Evia. The fires in August claimed the life of a volunteer fireman. In 2018, 102 people died in the fire at Mati, east of Athens, which was the second-deadliest wildfire of the century after the 2009 bushfires in Australia which killed 173 people. The fire at Mati also counted as the sixth-deadliest in the last 100 years. Scientists say there is little doubt that climate change from the burning of coal, oil and natural gas is driving more extreme weather events. Other affected areas in Greece include southern Peloponnese Peninsula, near Ancient Olympia, and Fokida, in the Central Greece region north of Athens. Another serious fire ravaged Mount Parnitha – a national park with substantial forests and the latest one that was burning until several days ago was the town of Vilia, west of Athens. The island of Rhodos has also been heavily affected by the August fires. Greece is facing a "natural disaster of unprecedented proportions", Greek Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis said. He apologized "for any weaknesses" on the part of the government in containing the wildfires, which have destroyed hundreds of homes and forced people to evacuate dozens of villages over the past weeks. "These last days have been some of the most difficult for our country in decades," Mitsotakis said, blaming "the extreme heat and months of drought".
Greek Tribune Adelaide, South Australia
© 2021 Greek Community Tribune All Rights Reserved

Disaster of unprecedented proportions in

Greece

22 August 2021 Greece has been ravaged by hundreds of wildfires in August, during its most severe heat wave in decades, which left unprecedented devastation to the forests and towns. Other Mediterranean countries – Turkey, Italy, Algeria and Spain among them – have suffered similar problems. The two major fires in Greece began in early August, one on the island of Evia and another in a national park north of Athens. The environmental devastation from the fires in northern Evia is enormous, according to a statement issued by the meteorological service of the National Observatory of Athens (NOA). According to the NOA, a total of 126,023 acres (or 510,000 stremmata) has been burned on the island of Evia. The fires in August claimed the life of a volunteer fireman. In 2018, 102 people died in the fire at Mati, east of Athens, which was the second-deadliest wildfire of the century after the 2009 bushfires in Australia which killed 173 people. The fire at Mati also counted as the sixth-deadliest in the last 100 years. Scientists say there is little doubt that climate change from the burning of coal, oil and natural gas is driving more extreme weather events. Other affected areas in Greece include southern Peloponnese Peninsula, near Ancient Olympia, and Fokida, in the Central Greece region north of Athens. Another serious fire ravaged Mount Parnitha – a national park with substantial forests and the latest one that was burning until several days ago was the town of Vilia, west of Athens. The island of Rhodos has also been heavily affected by the August fires. Greece is facing a "natural disaster of unprecedented proportions", Greek Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis said. He apologized "for any weaknesses" on the part of the government in containing the wildfires, which have destroyed hundreds of homes and forced people to evacuate dozens of villages over the past weeks. "These last days have been some of the most difficult for our country in decades," Mitsotakis said, blaming "the extreme heat and months of drought".
Greek Tribune
Adelaide, South Australia