© 2021 Greek Community Tribune All Rights Reserved
Table grape exports to China in crisis The federal Trade Minister says the government is trying to understand why China has delayed importing table grapes at a cost the Australian industry estimates to be worth millions of dollars a week. Dan Tehan says he “won’t jump to any conclusions” about the possibility that the $300 million a year table grape trade to China is the latest casualty in the trade war with the superpower. According to the ABC, in the past year China has wiped billions of dollars of Australian exports including barley, red wine, meat, seafood, timber, cotton and coal. Now, Australian growers say containers of fresh table grapes that would normally clear China’s customs authorities in one or two days have been delayed by up to 20 days, sometimes without refrigeration. Mr Tehan told the ABC the government had asked Australian exporters to keep him informed about what they’re hearing from Chinese customers. “About 80 per cent of table grape exports seem to have got in seamlessly,” he said. “We’re trying to work out what is the cause of the hold-up”. The Australian Table Grape Association (ATGA) estimates the delays, which began six weeks ago, could cost growers and exporters up to $40,000 per container. Typically during the April and May peak Australia would send as many as 300 containers of table grapes a week to China, but the ABC understands as few as 125 containers per week have “landed” in China this year. “The whole industry is very concerned because the delays are causing huge losses to table grape growers and exporters,” ATGA chief executive Jeff Scott said China is the most lucrative market for Australian table grapes and accounts for more than 40 per cent of all table grape exports. While the government seeks answers on the grape delays, it is considering launching an appeal to the World Trade Organization over the disruption to Australia’s wine trade.
Greek Tribune Adelaide, South Australia
© 2021 Greek Community Tribune All Rights Reserved
Table grape exports to China in crisis The federal Trade Minister says the government is trying to understand why China has delayed importing table grapes at a cost the Australian industry estimates to be worth millions of dollars a week. Dan Tehan says he “won’t jump to any conclusions” about the possibility that the $300 million a year table grape trade to China is the latest casualty in the trade war with the superpower. According to the ABC, in the past year China has wiped billions of dollars of Australian exports including barley, red wine, meat, seafood, timber, cotton and coal. Now, Australian growers say containers of fresh table grapes that would normally clear China’s customs authorities in one or two days have been delayed by up to 20 days, sometimes without refrigeration. Mr Tehan told the ABC the government had asked Australian exporters to keep him informed about what they’re hearing from Chinese customers. “About 80 per cent of table grape exports seem to have got in seamlessly,” he said. “We’re trying to work out what is the cause of the hold-up”. The Australian Table Grape Association (ATGA) estimates the delays, which began six weeks ago, could cost growers and exporters up to $40,000 per container. Typically during the April and May peak Australia would send as many as 300 containers of table grapes a week to China, but the ABC understands as few as 125 containers per week have “landed” in China this year. “The whole industry is very concerned because the delays are causing huge losses to table grape growers and exporters,” ATGA chief executive Jeff Scott said China is the most lucrative market for Australian table grapes and accounts for more than 40 per cent of all table grape exports. While the government seeks answers on the grape delays, it is considering launching an appeal to the World Trade Organization over the disruption to Australia’s wine trade.
Greek Tribune
Adelaide, South Australia