© 2021 Greek Community Tribune All Rights Reserved

Plans to open up by Christmas

November 2021 South Australia will ease its border restrictions for double-vaccinated people from November 23. That date will also see the state halve its quarantine period for international travellers from 14 days to seven, and increase its cap on home gatherings from 20 people to 30. The ABC network reported on Wednesday that the measures are part of the state's much anticipated COVID-Ready roadmap. Health authorities expect that 80 per cent of the state's population aged 16 and over will have received a second vaccination dose by November 23 or very shortly afterwards. Premier Steven Marshall said the "vast majority" of other restrictions in SA would ease once 90 per cent of people over the age of 12 are fully vaccinated. He said quarantine for double-vaccinated international travellers would be removed entirely once that milestone is reached, which is expected before Christmas. “Roadmap to ruin”? Two months from Christmas, Adelaide publican Simone Douglas says the South Australian government's COVID-Ready plan is nothing short of a "roadmap to ruin". Premier Steven Marshall revealed details of the plan on Wednesday, which has been pitched as the roadmap to reopening the state and managing coronavirus in the community. While border restrictions for double-vaccinated people will ease from November 23, the vast majority of restrictions currently imposed on activities will continue until 90 per cent of the SA population aged 12 and over is fully vaccinated. According to the ABC, Ms Douglas, who owns the Duke of Brunswick Hotel in the City of Adelaide, said she was hoping the restrictions banning standing consumption and dancing indoors would be lifted so the business could try to recover from its pandemic losses in the lead-up to Christmas. "It's a dead end for hospitality. There's no roadmap there," she said. "You've pretty much had a Premier that today basically cancelled Christmas for an entire industry." During Wednesday’s press conference, Mr Marshall said he was hopeful the state would reach the 90 per cent mark and be able to remove the restrictions before Christmas. "It's too late. That's the end of the season," Ms Douglas said. Confusion South Australia's Premier has admitted that not all of the modelling underpinning the state's COVID-19 roadmap has so far been received by health authorities and the state government. Mr Marshall has acknowledged that the state's COVID-19 caseload will inevitably increase from that date. "We will be letting the Delta variant into South Australia but we're going to do it only when it's safe to do so," he told parliament. He said modelling used as the basis for the plan indicated that such a point would be reached when 80 per cent of the state's population had been double-vaccinated. Mr Marshall on Wednesday conceded he had not read all of that information — because some of the modelling had not yet been "finalised". "The first set has been received here in South Australia, the second set is pending and no, I haven't read that second set," Mr Marshall told parliament. Mr Marshall said the state's COVID-Ready plan relied on two sets of modelling — the first provided by the Doherty Institute to National Cabinet, the second by "people who have, in the past, provided advice to the Doherty Institute". "We're satisfied with the information that was received that we could move to the removal of the restrictions … as of the 23rd of November. "What I can tell the house is that we will be releasing in a consolidated format the advice that we have received." But Mr Marshall further conceded that that would not necessarily include the Doherty Institute advice provided to National Cabinet, because it would "not be appropriate" without authorisation from federal authorities. Health Minister Stephen Wade told Parliament he had read the Doherty Institute's research, but that "further modelling" would be forthcoming. "I have read the Doherty [Institute] material but I must admit, I'm not a scientist, there was much I didn't understand," he said.
Greek Tribune Adelaide, South Australia
© 2021 Greek Community Tribune All Rights Reserved

Plans to open up by Christmas

November 2021 South Australia will ease its border restrictions for double- vaccinated people from November 23. That date will also see the state halve its quarantine period for international travellers from 14 days to seven, and increase its cap on home gatherings from 20 people to 30. The ABC network reported on Wednesday that the measures are part of the state's much anticipated COVID-Ready roadmap. Health authorities expect that 80 per cent of the state's population aged 16 and over will have received a second vaccination dose by November 23 or very shortly afterwards. Premier Steven Marshall said the "vast majority" of other restrictions in SA would ease once 90 per cent of people over the age of 12 are fully vaccinated. He said quarantine for double-vaccinated international travellers would be removed entirely once that milestone is reached, which is expected before Christmas. “Roadmap to ruin”? Two months from Christmas, Adelaide publican Simone Douglas says the South Australian government's COVID-Ready plan is nothing short of a "roadmap to ruin". Premier Steven Marshall revealed details of the plan on Wednesday, which has been pitched as the roadmap to reopening the state and managing coronavirus in the community. While border restrictions for double-vaccinated people will ease from November 23, the vast majority of restrictions currently imposed on activities will continue until 90 per cent of the SA population aged 12 and over is fully vaccinated. According to the ABC, Ms Douglas, who owns the Duke of Brunswick Hotel in the City of Adelaide, said she was hoping the restrictions banning standing consumption and dancing indoors would be lifted so the business could try to recover from its pandemic losses in the lead-up to Christmas. "It's a dead end for hospitality. There's no roadmap there," she said. "You've pretty much had a Premier that today basically cancelled Christmas for an entire industry." During Wednesday’s press conference, Mr Marshall said he was hopeful the state would reach the 90 per cent mark and be able to remove the restrictions before Christmas. "It's too late. That's the end of the season," Ms Douglas said. Confusion South Australia's Premier has admitted that not all of the modelling underpinning the state's COVID-19 roadmap has so far been received by health authorities and the state government. Mr Marshall has acknowledged that the state's COVID-19 caseload will inevitably increase from that date. "We will be letting the Delta variant into South Australia but we're going to do it only when it's safe to do so," he told parliament. He said modelling used as the basis for the plan indicated that such a point would be reached when 80 per cent of the state's population had been double-vaccinated. Mr Marshall on Wednesday conceded he had not read all of that information — because some of the modelling had not yet been "finalised". "The first set has been received here in South Australia, the second set is pending and no, I haven't read that second set," Mr Marshall told parliament. Mr Marshall said the state's COVID-Ready plan relied on two sets of modelling — the first provided by the Doherty Institute to National Cabinet, the second by "people who have, in the past, provided advice to the Doherty Institute". "We're satisfied with the information that was received that we could move to the removal of the restrictions … as of the 23rd of November. "What I can tell the house is that we will be releasing in a consolidated format the advice that we have received." But Mr Marshall further conceded that that would not necessarily include the Doherty Institute advice provided to National Cabinet, because it would "not be appropriate" without authorisation from federal authorities. Health Minister Stephen Wade told Parliament he had read the Doherty Institute's research, but that "further modelling" would be forthcoming. "I have read the Doherty [Institute] material but I must admit, I'm not a scientist, there was much I didn't understand," he said.
Greek Tribune
Adelaide, South Australia