© 2021 Greek Community Tribune All Rights Reserved

Ex-Cyclone Jasper continues to impact Queensland

22 December 2023 Far North Queensland is facing renewed flood threats as the effects of ex-cyclone Jasper linger a week after it hit the coast. The NEMBC News reported yesterday, the remote town of Kowanyama will see heavy rainfall, and Wujal Wujal is undergoing continued evacuations. Prime Minister Anthony Albanese and Queensland Premier Steven Miles are planning a Friday visit to assess the flood-hit areas. While 35 communities are isolated, there is relief that there have been no reported fatalities. However, concerns continue for an 85-year-old man near Wujal Wujal, who has been missing since Sunday. Crocodile sightings in floodwaters have prompted warnings, and locals have been cautioned about potential scams and looting. Recovery efforts are underway, with power restoration targeted to be completed by Christmas Eve, but a lengthy recovery period is expected. Record rainfall hits South Australia Tens of thousands of South Australians were left without power and a major catchment flooded for the first in 30 years after heavy rain and gale force winds lashed parts of the state over the previous weekend. The violent weather arrived in the north, west and the Eyre and Yorke peninsulas one day after extreme heat prompted the Country Fire Service to forecast a catastrophic bushfire danger warning. On Friday, Cleve residents endured temperatures of almost 35 degrees Celsius before more than 100 millimetres of rain fell on Saturday and Sunday. On Sunday night Yeldulknie Weir flooded for the first time since 1993. As reported by the ABC network, Cleve Mayor Phil Cameron said the rain fell constantly rather than in a burst, which limited the impact to a few road closures. "Thank God the rainfall was long and slow," he said. "The tanks are full — most of the locals will be out at Yeldulknie Weir, having a poke around and seeing an event that rarely happens. "The majority of farmers should be reasonably happy because it was a long, soaking rain. Widespread power outages At one point today more than 30,000 people were without power, according to SA Power Networks. The outages affected schools in Melrose, Booleroo, Wilmington and Orroroo, Clare Valley and Blyth, some of which were forced to close. Hospitals at Orroroo Centre and Booleroo also lost power and relied on back-up generators. The State Emergency Service (SES) has responded to about 900 jobs over the weekend — more than 700 jobs overnight and today — largely caused by fallen trees. 'Perfect' timing for farmers Outback communities and farmers, are celebrating what could be the start of a good season for green feed. Gillian Fennell, from Lambina Station in the far north, said the 28mm that fell at her farm was a welcome. "We're coming out of a really dry period," she said. "We're really pleased to take a bit of the pressure off coming into what we think is going to be a really hot summer. "We will see some really good grass growth and those things that really replenish the landscape." The beef farmer said the rain had come at the "perfect time of the year". Weather damages cherry crops The rain has caused concern for many farmers in the midst of their busiest harvest period, including Adelaide Hills cherry grower Tony Hannaford. "We picked madly for several days when it became apparent it was going to rain," he said. "Small rain over several days can do as much damage to cherries as a big rain in short period. Mr Hannaford said South Australians could expect to see less cherries on the market.
Greek Tribune Adelaide, South Australia
© 2021 Greek Community Tribune All Rights Reserved

Ex-Cyclone Jasper continues to impact

Queensland

22 December 2023 Far North Queensland is facing renewed flood threats as the effects of ex-cyclone Jasper linger a week after it hit the coast. The NEMBC News reported yesterday, the remote town of Kowanyama will see heavy rainfall, and Wujal Wujal is undergoing continued evacuations. Prime Minister Anthony Albanese and Queensland Premier Steven Miles are planning a Friday visit to assess the flood-hit areas. While 35 communities are isolated, there is relief that there have been no reported fatalities. However, concerns continue for an 85-year-old man near Wujal Wujal, who has been missing since Sunday. Crocodile sightings in floodwaters have prompted warnings, and locals have been cautioned about potential scams and looting. Recovery efforts are underway, with power restoration targeted to be completed by Christmas Eve, but a lengthy recovery period is expected. Record rainfall hits South Australia Tens of thousands of South Australians were left without power and a major catchment flooded for the first in 30 years after heavy rain and gale force winds lashed parts of the state over the previous weekend. The violent weather arrived in the north, west and the Eyre and Yorke peninsulas one day after extreme heat prompted the Country Fire Service to forecast a catastrophic bushfire danger warning. On Friday, Cleve residents endured temperatures of almost 35 degrees Celsius before more than 100 millimetres of rain fell on Saturday and Sunday. On Sunday night Yeldulknie Weir flooded for the first time since 1993. As reported by the ABC network, Cleve Mayor Phil Cameron said the rain fell constantly rather than in a burst, which limited the impact to a few road closures. "Thank God the rainfall was long and slow," he said. "The tanks are full — most of the locals will be out at Yeldulknie Weir, having a poke around and seeing an event that rarely happens. "The majority of farmers should be reasonably happy because it was a long, soaking rain. Widespread power outages At one point today more than 30,000 people were without power, according to SA Power Networks. The outages affected schools in Melrose, Booleroo, Wilmington and Orroroo, Clare Valley and Blyth, some of which were forced to close. Hospitals at Orroroo Centre and Booleroo also lost power and relied on back-up generators. The State Emergency Service (SES) has responded to about 900 jobs over the weekend — more than 700 jobs overnight and today — largely caused by fallen trees. 'Perfect' timing for farmers Outback communities and farmers, are celebrating what could be the start of a good season for green feed. Gillian Fennell, from Lambina Station in the far north, said the 28mm that fell at her farm was a welcome. "We're coming out of a really dry period," she said. "We're really pleased to take a bit of the pressure off coming into what we think is going to be a really hot summer. "We will see some really good grass growth and those things that really replenish the landscape." The beef farmer said the rain had come at the "perfect time of the year". Weather damages cherry crops The rain has caused concern for many farmers in the midst of their busiest harvest period, including Adelaide Hills cherry grower Tony Hannaford. "We picked madly for several days when it became apparent it was going to rain," he said. "Small rain over several days can do as much damage to cherries as a big rain in short period. Mr Hannaford said South Australians could expect to see less cherries on the market.
Greek Tribune Adelaide, South Australia