© 2021 Greek Community Tribune All Rights Reserved

AUSTRALIAN TRADE UNIONS:

Extreme right and neo-Nazis among the

protestors

Clashes continued on Saturday in Melbourne with Police arresting 94 people, mainly in St Kilda and the Melbourne CBD, after small groups of protesters gathered around the city for another day of anti- lockdown rallies. Most of the arrests took place on St Kilda Esplanade near the city early on Saturday afternoon. By the time a few dozen protesters had made their way to the foreshore, they were outnumbered by hundreds of police officers, who had arrived earlier and set up roadblocks. Police said people were arrested for breaching the Chief Health Officer's (CHO) directions, as well as drug-related offences and outstanding warrants. They will be issued with penalty notices and fined by up to $5000 each for breaching the Chief of Health directions," Victoria Police said in a statement. The gathering followed small protests across Melbourne on Friday where more than 200 people were arrested. The city of Melbourne has seen protests throughout the week, which began on Monday with a violent demonstration outside the Construction Forestry Maritime Mining and Energy Union (CFMEU) headquarters after the State Government announced vaccinations would be mandatory for construction workers. The union said only a minority of the protesters were union members (photo). "This crowd was heavily infiltrated by neo-Nazis and other right-wing extremist groups and it is clear that a minority of those who participated were actual union members," Dave Noonan, CFMEU national construction secretary, said in a statement, condemning the "far right extremist violence". In August, Sally McManus, secretary of the Australian Council of Trade Unions (ACTU), tweeted: “unions … are now facing what looks like an organised push by far-right groups and “want to be libertarian politicians” to convince people not to get vaccinated. “We will not tolerate such people dividing, confusing and playing with people’s lives and their jobs.” A larger rally on Tuesday included a number of anti-lockdown and anti-vaccination protesters as well as well as members of the far right, who blocked the West Gate Bridge as they protested across the city for hours. One man was photographed waving a large Donald Trump flag. In Adelaide, several hundred people attended a rally in Hindmarsh Square on Saturday and marched through the Rundle Mall. The gathering heard from speakers delivering anti-media messages, and some protesters held placards with messages opposing mandatory vaccination. While there were moments of tension between some protesters and members of the media, South Australian police said the rally had happened without major incident and no arrests had been made.
Greek Tribune Adelaide, South Australia
© 2021 Greek Community Tribune All Rights Reserved

AUSTRALIAN TRADE UNIONS:

Extreme right and neo-Nazis among the

protestors

Clashes continued on Saturday in Melbourne with Police arresting 94 people, mainly in St Kilda and the Melbourne CBD, after small groups of protesters gathered around the city for another day of anti-lockdown rallies. Most of the arrests took place on St Kilda Esplanade near the city early on Saturday afternoon. By the time a few dozen protesters had made their way to the foreshore, they were outnumbered by hundreds of police officers, who had arrived earlier and set up roadblocks. Police said people were arrested for breaching the Chief Health Officer's (CHO) directions, as well as drug-related offences and outstanding warrants. They will be issued with penalty notices and fined by up to $5000 each for breaching the Chief of Health directions," Victoria Police said in a statement. The gathering followed small protests across Melbourne on Friday where more than 200 people were arrested. The city of Melbourne has seen protests throughout the week, which began on Monday with a violent demonstration outside the Construction Forestry Maritime Mining and Energy Union (CFMEU) headquarters after the State Government announced vaccinations would be mandatory for construction workers. The union said only a minority of the protesters were union members (photo). "This crowd was heavily infiltrated by neo-Nazis and other right-wing extremist groups and it is clear that a minority of those who participated were actual union members," Dave Noonan, CFMEU national construction secretary, said in a statement, condemning the "far right extremist violence". In August, Sally McManus, secretary of the Australian Council of Trade Unions (ACTU), tweeted: “unions … are now facing what looks like an organised push by far-right groups and “want to be libertarian politicians” to convince people not to get vaccinated. “We will not tolerate such people dividing, confusing and playing with people’s lives and their jobs.” A larger rally on Tuesday included a number of anti-lockdown and anti-vaccination protesters as well as well as members of the far right, who blocked the West Gate Bridge as they protested across the city for hours. One man was photographed waving a large Donald Trump flag. In Adelaide, several hundred people attended a rally in Hindmarsh Square on Saturday and marched through the Rundle Mall. The gathering heard from speakers delivering anti-media messages, and some protesters held placards with messages opposing mandatory vaccination. While there were moments of tension between some protesters and members of the media, South Australian police said the rally had happened without major incident and no arrests had been made.
Greek Tribune
Adelaide, South Australia